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27-May-2022

Child Hit By Car

On Thursday evening May 26th at 6:47pm the Sheriff's Office responded to a report of a pedestrian that was struck by a vehicle on 8th St. W in the City of Browerville. The driver of the vehicle was eastbound on 8th St. when 8 year old male victim ran from behind a parked car into the traffic lane. The victim was struck and went under the vehicle. Medical treatment was provided at the scene by Deputies and the Browerville Ambulance. The victim was transported to Long Prairie Hospital then flown by North Air Care to Children's Hospital in the metro. The victim's condition is unknown at this time. The incident remains under investigation.

27-May-2022

State Wide Poultry Ban Extended

The Minnesota Board of Animal Health is extending the statewide ban on poultry events until Friday, July 1, 2022. Animal health officials first enacted the ban in April and extended it once already to reduce the potential risks of spreading HPAI, also known as bird flu. The ban includes all poultry swaps, fairs, exhibitions and other events where live poultry and susceptible birds are brought together and then disperse. The Board of Animal Health says a small number of recent HPAI detections in new counties is cause for the department to extend the ban, which primarily impacts backyard flock owners and is intended to protect their birds from a potential pathway for the virus to spread at poultry events. As part of the state and federal response, a detection of HPAI in a backyard flock means the owner cannot have any new birds for 150 days following disposal of infected birds. Biosecurity is still the most effective precaution backyard owners can follow to protect their flock. Direct selling of baby poultry is still allowed through private sales, stores, or via mail by National Poultry Improvement Plan authorized sellers. This temporary ban only applies to events where birds congregate and does not apply to poultry products. The H5N1 HPAI outbreak in Minnesota poses a high risk to poultry but low risk to the public. There is no food safety concern for consumers.

 

 

 

26-May-2022

Man Charged In Brother's Death

A Hill City man has been charged with allegedly fatally shooting his brother and leaving his body in a camper for seven months. The Aitkin County Sheriff's Office states that 48-year-old James Robert Hess was arrested Tuesday morning at his home. He has been charged with the 2nd-degree murder of his 52-year-old brother, William Harold Hess Jr. Hess Jr. was found dead in Aitkin County from a gunshot wound on May 12 in a homemade camper, located west of 380th Avenue in Hill Lake Township. However, police say that Hess Jr. is believed to have been killed in October 2021. Hess made an appearance in Aitkin County District Court Wednesday morning. Bail has been set for $1 million or bond with no conditions, or $500,000 non-cash bond with conditions, or $500,000 cash bail with conditions. He remains in Aitkin County Jail with "additional charges pending," the sheriff's office says.

 

 

 

26-May-2022

Man Charged with Pointing Handgun At People At Brainerd Bar

A man who was recently hired by Essentia Health in Brainerd as their new senior vice president of operations is facing felony charges for allegedly pointing a handgun at two people outside a bar in downtown Brainerd. 41-year-old John Sperrazza was charged Wednesday in Crow Wing County Court with felony second-degree assault with a dangerous weapon, serious felony second-degree assault with a dangerous weapon, and felony threats of violence with reckless disregard. According to the criminal complaint in the case, Sperrazza was at Shep’s Bar and struck up conversation with a group of four people. They all then went to SE’z Bar from there, and the other individuals reported Sperrazza became verbally abusive. The criminal complaint says that later that night in the parking lot, Sperrazza pointed a gun at two of the people in the group. Investigators say a review of surveillance cameras appears to corroborate the reports of the witnesses. Essentia Health announced the hiring of Sperrazza as their new senior vice president of operations in a web postdated March 22nd of this year. According to that post, Sperrazza previously served as the senior vice president of operations for Essentia’s West market, representing areas in North Dakota and Western Minnesota. In a statement from Essentia Health Sperrazza has since been placed on administrative leave. 

26-May-2022

Todd County Sheriff

During the week of May 15th through May 21st, the Todd County Sheriff's Office responded to 215 calls for service. The following were the types of calls: 85 traffic stops, 15 civil process, 9 suspicious activity type complaints, 6 assists to other agencies, 2 farm animals out complaints, 1 domestic / disturbance, 5 traffic complaints, 6 motorist assists, 4 scam complaints, 2 accidents, and 7 welfare checks. Todd County Dispatch received 73 - 911 Calls during the week.

 

04-Jan-2022

Covid-19 Update

Tuesday's COVID-19 update from the Minnesota Department of Health includes 16,204 newly reported cases and 36 newly reported deaths, including a person aged 25-29 from Dakota County. The state's COVID-19 death toll is now 10,600. Today's report includes data that was reported in a 96-hour holiday period ending at 4 a.m. Monday, Jan. 3, so the numbers are inflated compared to a single day of reporting.  Minnesota's test positivity rate on a 7-day rolling average (through Dec. 27) is 12.0%, Anything over 10% puts Minnesota in the high-risk threshold for community transmission of the coronavirus. Through Jan. 3, the number of people with COVID-19 hospitalized in Minnesota was 1,370 – up from the 1,313 reported on Dec. 30. Of those hospitalized, 293 people are in intensive care (up from 283) and 1,077 are in non-ICU care (up from 1,030). The latest hospital capacity data shows there are 30 staffed adult ICU beds available in the entire state – down from 32 on Dec. 30 – and 11 pediatric ICU beds available, which is down from 13 on Dec. 30. Todd county is currently at 5,316 confirmed cases of covid-19 along with 52 deaths.

 

 

 

 


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Covid-19 information

Information from Centracare - Long Prairie

 

What is COVID-19?
COVID-19 is a viral respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus, which is a large family of viruses. Other coronavirus outbreaks include (SARS) in 2003 or MERS in 2012. COVID-19 is in the same family of viruses.
How does COVID-19 spread?
The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others through respiratory droplets produced when they cough or sneeze. A person can have COVID-19 before experiencing symptoms. People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest) and some spread might be possible before people show symptoms.
What are the symptoms of COVID-19?
Patients with confirmed COVID-19 have had mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:
• Fever
• Cough
• Shortness of breath
The CDC believes that symptoms of COVID-19 may appear two to 14 days after exposure.
What should I do if I think I have COVID-19?
If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your health care provider. For CentraCare, please call CentraCare Connect at 320-200-3200. DO NOT go to the ER or urgent care. Call first.
Who can be tested for COVID-19?
Symptoms are similar to other respiratory illnesses, such as influenza, so experiencing these symptoms alone does not necessarily mean you need to be tested for COVID-19. Additional criteria will help your health care provider decide if you should be tested, such as:
• If you have history of recent travel (within past 14 days) from an affected geographic area.
• If you had close contact with any person who is a lab-confirmed COVID-19 patient.
How can I protect myself from COVID-19?
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Who is at higher risk for getting COVID-19?
• Older adults
• People who have serious chronic medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or lung disease

What To Do if You Are Sick

Call your doctor: If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below: If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, follow the steps below to help protect other people in your home and community.

man in bed
Stay home except to get medical care
  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to recover at home. Do not leave, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you feel worse or you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
family separated
Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as home isolation
  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific “sick room” and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just like you would around other people.
    • Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known.
    • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick with COVID-19. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with them. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.
on the phone with doctor
Call ahead before visiting your doctor
  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call your doctor’s office or emergency department, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.
man wearing a mask
Wear a facemask if you are sick
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live in the home should stay in a different room. When caregivers enter the room of the sick person, they should wear a facemask. Visitors, other than caregivers, are not recommended.
woman covering their mouth when coughing
Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
washing hands
Clean your hands often
  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option, especially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
don't share
Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Do not share: Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
cleaning a counter
Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

Clean high-touch surfaces in your isolation area (“sick room” and bathroom) every day; let a caregiver clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in other areas of the home.

  • Clean and disinfect: Routinely clean high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom.
    • If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick person’s bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom.

High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

  • Clean and disinfect areas that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Household cleaners and disinfectants: Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.
    • Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
    • Most EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
taking temperature
Monitor your symptoms
  • Seek medical attention, but call first: Seek medical care right away if your illness is worsening (for example, if you have difficulty breathing).
    • Call your doctor before going in: Before going to the doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do.
  • Wear a facemask: If possible, put on a facemask before you enter the building. If you can’t put on a facemask, try to keep a safe distance from other people (at least 6 feet away). This will help protect the people in the office or waiting room.
  • Follow care instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department: Your local health authorities will give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before medical help arrives.

father playing with his son
How to discontinue home isolation
  • People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:
    • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
      • at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
    • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
        you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

 

The KEYL/KXDL Radio Auction will not be on the air until further notice. We thank you for your patience during this uncertain time.

Exciting News!!! You can now, not only hear Hometown Radio KEYL on AM 1400, but you can also listen to us on FM 103.1.

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